29 May

World’s first infrared telescope to decode universe mysteries

World's first infrared telescope to decode universe mysteries

World’s first infrared telescope to decode universe mysteries

The largest optical and infrared telescope in the world is being built in Chile, which will help scientists understand the inner workings of the universe.

With a primary mirror of 39 meters in diameter, the European Southern Observatory (ESO) builds Extremely Large Telescope (ELT).

Unlike any before, ELT is designed to be an adaptive telescope and has the ability to set atmospheric turbulence by taking the engineering telescope to a new level.

The future giant telescope installed in the year 2024 was built on the top of Cerro Armazones, a mountain peak 3046 meters in Chile.

Scientists at Oxford University play a key role in the project and are responsible for the design and construction of the spectrograph; “HARMONI”, an instrument designed to take pictures simultaneously 4000, each of a slightly different color.

The visible and near-infrared adaptive optics instrument operates the telescope to provide very sharp images.

“HARMONI” will allow scientists to form a more detailed picture of the formation and evolution of objects in the universe.

This will help researchers see everything from planets to our own solar system and stars in our own galaxy and nearby, with unprecedented depth and precision, formation and evolution of galaxies that have never been observed before.

“The ELT is a major step forward in capability, and that means we will use to find many interesting things about the universe that we do not have knowledge of today,” said Niranjan Thatte, principal investigator of ‘HARMONI’ and professor of astrophysics In the physics department of Oxford.

“This is the element of” the exploration of the unknown “that most excites me about the ELT. It will be an engineering piece, and its size and light weight will harm all the other telescopes we have built so far,” said Thatte.

“ELTs produce discoveries that we simply can not imagine today and certainly inspire many people in the world to think about science, technology and our place in the universe,” said Tim DE Zeeuw, CEO of ESO.

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